File No. CAPART/WSD/NGA/2006-07                                              

Date: 17 April, 2008

 

 

Circular

 

The guidelines for Nirmal Gram Abhiyan (NGA) were placed before the Executive Committee meeting held on 15th February, 2008, for approval. The EC approved the guidelines of NGA and also ratified the pilot projects sanctioned earlier. A copy of the approved guidelines is also enclosed herewith for compliance.

In addition to the above, the NGA projects will be implemented keeping in view the following:

  1. Selection of NGOs will be made by following the existing policy guidelines of CAPART. This would henceforth be an activity under the scheme of Organization of Beneficiaries (OB) and files will be opened accordingly.

 

  1. CAPART norms to be followed for selection of NGO and sanctioning of projects with respect to eligibility criteria, monitoring and release of funds, etc.

 

  1. One NGO will be given only one NGA project, and in case of large districts, more than one project can be given for the same district either to the same NGO, if it has the required capacity to implement and also falls within the eligibility norms of having not more than 3 ongoing CAPART projects at a time, or to other eligible NGOs.

 

  1. Apart from regular monitoring by Institutional Monitors, concurrent monitoring through YPs/ROs, etc. has to be invariably be done in each case.  Additionally, on a random basis, 5% of all cases should be concurrently monitored by teams deputed from Headquarters on the basis of some projects identified in Hqtrs. office. Accordingly, VOs already sanctioned projects under NGA may be asked to submit action plan well in advance with place, date and time.

 

  1. FCEs should be deputed for mid-term evaluation and funds be released as 2nd installment only after satisfactory mid-term evaluation report. The Regional Committees may be apprised of the full facts of the sanctioned projects, especially about the VOs satisfying the eligibility criteria and their conformity with other CAPART norms and ex-post facto approval for the projects may be obtained. The NGA programme and the projects already sanctioned on pilot basis and being implemented in 40 districts have been ratified by the EC on 15/02/2008.

 

 

 

 

 

The RR & MCs are also directed to conduct an internal exercise for identifying cases where CAPART guidelines have been violated, especially with regard to eligibility criteria, the number of ongoing projects and the status of the VOs as per PIMS data. Cases in which violations are noticed may be identified and reported so that they can be considered for termination, if needed necessary, by the appropriate authority.

 

This issues with the approval of Competent Authority.

 

 

(Sanjay Awasthi)

Director (Finance)

Distribution:

 

1.      All RR & MC, RCs of CAPART

2.      SES to DG

3.      PS to DDG(G)

4.      PS to CVO

5.      Dir (CD)

Guidelines

 

Nirmal Gram Abhiyan

BACKGROUND:

In the vicious cycle of poverty as well as underdevelopment, lack of proper sanitation facilities is an important factor. The lack of sanitation facility leads to diseases, incapacity, lesser productivity, higher spending on medicines and treatment and then lesser incomes, no or less saving, unwanted debts and adversely affects overall human development. Eighty per cent of the diseases afflicting mankind are either water-borne or excreta-related1. Yet, the majority of people in rural areas continue the age-old practice of indiscriminate open defecation, which poses a serious threat to the sources of drinking water in the community, and poses continuous health risks in the day-to-day life of the community through direct or indirect contact with human excreta.

Centuries-old beliefs and customs reinforce the practice of open defecation in disregard of its impact on the environment and the health of children, family and Community. As a result, the coverage of sanitary latrines in rural areas remains extremely poor.

Open defecation remains the predominant norm and poses one of the biggest threats to the health of the people in India. 2Estimates suggest that nearly 65 percent of India’s population still defecate in the open. This results in a faecal load of 200,000 metric tons per day, which finds its way into soil and water bodies, contaminating them with pathogens. The practice of open defecation is reinforced by traditional behaviour patterns and lack of awareness about the health threats posed by it. At the same time, there is little awareness about the potential health and consequent economic benefits of sanitation facilities. This is a key causative factor behind the high prevalence of soil and water borne diseases in rural India. The magnitude of the challenge has also been underscored by World Health Organisation (WHO) ascribing about 80 percent of all sicknesses and diseases to lack of safe water and sanitation such as diarrhoea, cholera, malaria, etc. in the country. This indicates an annual loss of 180 million man-days and Rs.12 billion to the economy owing to sanitation related diseases (Central Bureau of Health Intelligence, MoHFW, 1998-1999). The safe disposal of solid and liquid waste is not accorded priority at either the family or community level. There is no planned effort in rural schools to inculcate good hygienic habits in children.

One of the principal, though unstated, reasons why people have not come forward to join any sanitation-related movement is because it lacks social prestige (this may be due to caste, age-old beliefs, taboos and [1]practices). The upper strata of society have not concerned themselves with this issue at all. They have preferred involvement in the national-literacy programme; the immunization programme; the family welfare programme; the girl child; the non-conventional energy programme; the welfare of the disabled; afforestation & environmental pollution (not related to sanitation) such as air and river water pollution; and now, the latest craze is to join the awareness campaign on AIDS.

An equally important reason is that the construction of latrines involves a monetary expense. People would prefer to utilize their money to satisfy other felt needs, such as consumer goods.
In the circumstances, there is an urgent need for awareness-creation for felt-need and demand generation for sanitary latrines- the link between sanitation, health and safe drinking water needs to be emphasized, and community participation ensured for the sustainability of the behaviour-change in the community.


 Salient Features of Nirmal Gram:

v                No open defection

v                Toilets in every household and institutions

v                Proper usage of toilet

v                Proper handling of drinking water and cooked food

v                Hand washing with soap before eating and after anal cleansing

v                Cleanliness of household environment and institutional campus

v                Solid Waste disposal in garbage/compost pit

v                Proper use of Waste Water or disposal in soak pit

v                Hygienic practices like nail cutting, wearing of clean clothes etc.

 

 

OBJECTIVES:

Ø     To trigger the community to feel the need of stopping open defecation practices;

Ø     To generate collective action at the community level with regard to water and sanitation;

Ø     To promote low-cost, location-specific appropriate technologies of household toilet;

Ø     To bring behavioural changes amongst the community on various aspects of water and sanitation.

Ø     To strengthen the supply chain by streamlining Production Center and Rural Sanitary Mart;

 

In the proposed awareness generation programme, the following seven components to bring total sanitation will be emphasized:

Seven Components of Total Sanitation:

 

1.     Collection, storage & use of safe drinking water;

2.     Disposal of liquid waste;

3.     Safe disposal of human excreta (including child excreta)

4.     Disposal of solid waste;

5.     Home sanitation & food hygiene;

6.     Personal hygiene (including washing hands); and

7.     Environmental hygiene.

GOAL: To achieve the status of Nirmal Gram in every Panchayat.

 

 

STRATEGY:

Selection of Target Areas:

The programme will be implemented in fifty selected districts across various states of India  which are reported with no progress in the Total Sanitation Campaign. A list of selected districts has been given in Annexure – 1. However in the first phase the target areas in the district will be those Block headquarters, which are Village Panchayats. For implementation of the programme NGOs having grass root level experience will be selected through a transparent selection process.  Following the selection of NGOs, a meeting of District Water and Sanitation Committee will be organized to induct the selected NGOs, establish coordination with the DWSC and VWSC and make them familiar with the activities under Total Sanitation Campaign. One NGO will be given responsibility of 1-5 Village Panchayats depending upon its capacity. A maximum of one-year period will be specified for the NGOs to achieve the target of Nirmal Gram Panchayats for the Village Panchayat/s entrusted to them.

Training & Exposure Visit:

To begin with, CAPART will conduct an output- oriented training of representatives of the selected NGOs and PRIs, as well as grass root government functionaries working in the selected Village Panchayats.  The training workshop will be held at the District headquarters and will focus on giving the participants not only hands on field experience of Total Sanitation Approach launched by CAPART but also through them become the first to trigger the community to stop open defecation practice.

The main postulates of the CAPART Total Sanitation Approach are:

Ø     Collective Community decision and collective local action     

Ø     Social Solidarity and cooperation emerge in abundance

Ø     Natural Leadership emerges from the collective local actions and that leads future collective initiatives

Ø     The community often doesn’t follow externally determined modes of development or blue prints

Ø     Local diversity and innovation also emerge in the process

The Total Sanitation Approach has various tools such as:

1.     Transect Walk to Defecation sites (Walk of Shame)

2.     Defecation Mapping

3.     Calculation of Faeces

4.     Flow Diagram & Faeces to mouth communication

5.     Cost of illness

6.     Water Quality Assessment

The detailed concept of Total Sanitation Approach is given in Annexure - 2

Soon after the training workshop an Exposure Visit will be organized to the nearest Village Panchayat where Total Sanitation Campaign has already been successfully implemented. The exposure visit will give an insight to the participants into the various processes involved in making the village panchayat a Nirmal Gram. After returning from the exposure visit, actual implementation of the programme will start with Gram Sabha meetings of the Village Panchayats involving PRI functionaries, grass-root and block level government officials, village elders, women SHGs and others to be conducted by the NGO with facilitation by CAPART.

 

Community Animator:

In every Panchayat covered by this programme, an opinion leader from the village panchayat in the age group of 35-45 years will be selected as Community Animator for motivating the village people to stop open defecation practices through inter-personal communication by explaining various hazards of open defecation. The responsibility of Community Animator will be:

Ø     To disseminate information, awareness regarding the importance of sanitation to the community.

Ø     To address various problems of superstitions, psychological barriers and mental block of the community attached with water and sanitation related habits.

Ø     To generate demand, assist the Village Water and Sanitation Committee (VWSC) in getting the supply of required hardware for toilet constructions.

Ø     To motivate the school students for bringing behavioural changes with regard to water, hygiene and sanitation.

 

School Sanitation:

School is important for cognitive, creative and social development of children. So are the School Sanitation and Hygiene Education, necessary for the safe, secure and healthy environment for children to learn better and face the challenges of future life. To realise this, a peer group will be formed in every school to act on the following water, hygiene and sanitation related matter.

Ø     Hand washing before eating and after defecation

Ø     Nail cutting, proper combing wearing clean clothes;

Ø     Cleaning of class rooms, verandah / lobby;

Ø     Proper cleaning of urinals/ toilets and surroundings on rotation basis;

Production Center (PC) and Rural Sanitary Mart (RSM):

For strengthening the delivery mechanism, making provision of low cost sanitary and hygiene related items and information is very essential. To realise this, the NGO selected for the District will

a)     Motivate NGOs / SHGs to start Production Center and Rural Sanitary Mart if the latter does not exist.

b)     Where PC and RSM exist, generate demand and act as liaison between panchayat and RSM. A steady supply and demand between Production Centers, RSM, Panchayat and end users will be ensured.

 

Monitoring:

For the success of the programme, there will be regular monitoring by the concerned Regional Offices of CAPART. The Regional Implementation Committee at the Regional Center will review on a monthly basis the progress of work by the NGOs working in the respective areas.  The performance of the Village Animator will be regularly monitored by the Project Coordinator of the NGO. Apart from this, a computerized online format will be developed for obtaining physical and financial progress report from the selected NGOs on online basis. The submitted online report will be scrutinized by the Regional Offices of CAPART and will be submitted to the CAPART headquarters at the end of every month with their own observation on the quality of the execution of the programme by the NGOs at the field level. 

 

Recognition & Award:

There will be a provision for recognition and cash awards for the successful NGOs who achieve the targets of having 10 Nirmal Gram Panchayats per Block, individuals, and Village Panchayats who have contributed significantly in the making of Nirmal Gram Panchayats. Best schools will also be recognized and given Awards.

 

Funding Pattern:

CAPART will provide funds for the Nirmal Gram Abhiyan. The funding will be done in two equal installments. After selection of the NGOs for implementing the programme, an amount not exceeding six months expenditure will be considered for release as 1st  installment giving the full quantum of item-wise details. After release of the first installment, the selected NGOs will have to submit online progress reports every month. In addition to this, selected NGOs will submit six monthly physical progress reports as per format prescribed by CAPART clearly indicating the details of the activities carried out, achievements of the project against the quantitative and qualitative targets set for the period, audited/unaudited Receipt and Payment A/c. and Utilization Certificate, some photographs of the project and a report on the problems faced, if any, during the implementation of the project. Request for release of the second installment of grant should be submitted to CAPART latest within 30 days of the completion of the first six months’ period.

 

BUDGET FOR A DISTRICT:

 

 

District Level Budget for 1 Year

Sl. No

Description

No of Unit

Unit Cost (in Rs)

Total Amount for 1 Yr (in Rs)

1

Training at the District (50 Persons)

1

32950

32950

2

Exposure Visit      (50 Persons)

1

25000

25000

3

Salary of Project Coordinator

2

3000

72000

4

Honorarium to Village Animator

10

200

24000

5

Incentive to Community Animator

10

Rs 25/- per case for completion and use of toilet. Rs 200/-   for bringing total sanitation in the school

52000

6

 # Awards to NGOs

2

11000

22000

7

 * Awards to Schools

10

2500

25000

8

Travel, Supervision, Meetings, Activities and Administrative Costs

2

40000

80000

Grand Total

285950

 

Note:

 

The Budget has been prepared making assumption that 2 NGOs will be selected in a District.

Incentive to the Community Animator has been calculated by taking an average of 200 households in a Village Panchayat.

The Honorarium and Incentive to the Community Animator is applicable where there is no similar arrangement in the implementation of the Total Sanitation Campaign by the District Administration.

# The NGOs will be given an award of Rs 10000/- and Rs 1000/- for Citation)

* An award of Rs 2000/- plus Shield will be given to the successful Schools who achieve 100% success.

The Awards to NGOs and Schools will be borne from the regular budgetary allocation of the concerned Regional Center of CAPART, hence not included in the actual budget.
Budget for District level Training Workshop:

 

 

District Level Training

Sl No

Description

Unit Cost (in Rs)

Days

No of Unit

Total Amount (in Rs)

1

Conveyance                        (5 vehicle will be hired to pick up and drop the participants from selected village panchayats)

500

2

5

5000

3

Local Conveyance

Rs 50/- for 1st

& 4th day and

Rs 25 for 2nd & 3rd day

4

50

7500

2

Food & Beverages

60

4

55

13200

3

Folder

20

-

50

1000

4

Stationeries

-

-

-

1500

5

Multimedia & Sounds

750

1

-

750

6

 * Training Venue

500

4

-

2000

7

Honorarium to Resource Persons

500

4

2

4000

8

 # Travel Allowance to Resource Person          (subject to actuals)

1000

-

2

2000

 Grand Total

32950

 

* Depending on requirement, hence not included in the actual cost of the training.

 

# T.A to resource persons will be subject to actuals and borne from the regular budgetary allocation of the concerned Regional Center of CAPART, hence not included in the actual cost of the training.

 

Total Sanitation Approach (TSA)

The Principle:

Total Sanitation Approach (TSA) also known as Nirmal Gram Abhiyan – means involvement of everyone in the community in the mission of total elimination of open defecation. In this process, facilitators encourage communities to carry out their own appraisal and analysis of community sanitation. This generally leads them to recognize the negative impact of human waste on the eco-system or the surrounding areas and the shameful practice followed by them so far. The resulting disgust and desire for self- respect can induce them to take immediate and comprehensive action by digging and building latrines and stopping open defecation without waiting for external support in the form of hardware subsidy.

 

The main postulates of Total Sanitation Approach are:

Ø      Collective Community decision and collective local action

Ø      Social Solidarity and cooperation are seen in abundance

Ø      Natural Leaders emerge from collective local actions  and lead future collective initiatives

Ø      They often don’t follow externally determined mode of development and blue print

Ø      Local diversity and innovations are the main elements

 

The Total Sanitation Approach has various tools such as:

Ø      Transect Walk to Defecation sites (Walk of Shame)

Ø      Defecation Mapping

Ø      Calculation of Fasces

Ø      Flow Diagram & Faeces to mouth communication

Ø      Cost of illness

Ø      Water Quality Assessment

 

1. Transect Walk to Defecation sites (Walk of Shame)

During this process the facilitators along with the community members take walk around the village. The group would stop at some places where people generally defecate openly. The team generally discover during such transect walk that the accompanying members of the community feel very embarrassed to visit these dirty spots with the facilitators. They generally attempt to move the facilitators away from the area but the more the community try to move them on, the more they would stop and ask them questions. For example, if the facilitator asks which families use these spots for defecation, what happens during emergency, defecation at night, during seasons of high diarrhea; the questions are normally answered with everyone’s hands covering their noses. The feeling of embarrassment translates into strong desire to stop open defecation. This transect walk is popularly known as ‘Walk of Shame’.

 

2. Defecation Mapping:

During the meeting with the community, a mapping exercise is generally initiated, where the community maps all the households of the village and indicate whether or not they have toilet. Next the villagers mark the common places visited by them for open defecation and connect those places with their house.

 

3. Calculation of Faceces:

The community then carries out collective calculation of faeces contributed per household in a facilitated process. Household choose their own method of calculation to give numeric value to how much each house is adding to the problem. This participatory tool allows community to realize the magnitude and extent of the problem. People start measurement from single individual per family for one day to one year. These numbers generally surprise and motivate them to curb the spread of those shameful practices. The communities are generally horrified by such figures and they immediately start to wonder about the various ways in which ground water and topsoil can be contaminated.

 

4. Flow diagram & faeces to mouth communication:

The contamination route of human excreta to water sources, household utensils, domestic articles & most importantly food through flies, chickens and pets is tracked. Shocking facts often emerged from people’s analysis with the revelation that each person was ingesting faeces in some form everyday. This apart the excreta brought from the transact walk would be kept beside the rice bowl on the map and within few minutes the movement of flies starts from the excreta to rice bowl. By this the community normally realizes that the food they eat is not safe enough if it is kept open. Such revelation brings with them feeling of dejection and people generally want to start doing something about it immediately. The tempo builds up and people starts talking about the way forward and about the plan to mitigate the problem.

 

5. Cost of illness:

When community is convinced that they are ingesting faeces which is the route cause of many diseases such as diarrhea. Jaundice, malaria etc, the community then does assessment on the expenses incurred in the treatment of these diseases in a year. This exercise is done to let the community realize how their hard earn money is needlessly spent on treatment because of the following or open defecation practices by the community.

 

6. Water Quality Assessment:

The facilitator then does an assessment of the drinking water of various sources by taking the water sampling in H2S strip. If the water turns black within 24 to 48 hrs, the water is started to faecal contamination.

 

7. Action Plan & Community Monitoring:

Application of the above trigger inflicts positive impact on the community to deal with the situation in a time bound manner and at this point people start voicing their eagerness to stop open defecation. Sensing the community’s feeling, the facilitator draws one/two option for low cost toilet so as to sensitize the community member to get read of the maladies of open defecation. The members of the committee vow to complete construction of their home made latrines within a week and take the responsibility for persuading 10 to 12 household in their neighborhoods to do the same. In this process the facilitator generates demand and make action plan accordingly.

 

Chasing the action plan, the community adopts a monitoring mechanism to ensure proper implementation of their action plan. The village elders, women, SHGs, children groups can play an important role in monitoring the change and exert pressure on those numbers who are still practicing the open defecation.

 

Sequential process applied in the village by the field facilitators’ team

Enter into village and explain purpose of visit (often discussion with the community during a transact walk through a village

Build rapport with the community

(Initially villages were chosen where the NGO already had a programme and established rapport )

Arrange meetings with the village community in a suitable place

(Where large number of people can sit and work)

Explain objective to the community and create environment conducive to learning and sharing

Analyze  the situation: (Ignition PRA)

Social mapping of the village

Defecation map

Defecation Mobility(Including Crisis Defecation)

Problem of defecation of landless and poor

Open defecation area and water point transect

Changes and trend of village water sanitation situation

Well being grouping and possessions of toilets by different groups

Livelihoods analysis

Calculation of amount of excreta being added to the village by open defecation and its impact on different well being groups, as well as men, women and children

Flow diagram of pollution caused by excreta and faecal- oral contamination links

Group discussion on disease caused due to open defecation, emergency, cost of medicines, doctors etc.

Thanking villagers for sharing experiences and large group presentation

Action planning by the villagers

(Formation of action groups, deciding on responsibilities and deadlines etc.)

 

 

 

 Annexure-3

Workshop Schedule

Day-1

Time

Activity

Remark

9:30-11:00

Introduction/icebreaking /expectations of participants/ norm setting/group formation

Resource team

11:00-11:15

Tea Break

Resource team

11:15-12:00

Participatory exercise to discuss experiences of TSC implementation in the District.

What is the over all objective of TSC; toilet construction or stopping open defecation? 

Group exercise

12:00-13:00

Developing ODF villages- is it possible? Film, followed by presentation and discussion

Resource team

13:00-14:00

Lunch

 

14:00-15:00

Trigger approach to sanitation behavior change: what is a ‘trigger’, how to identify local triggers, some triggers identified in rural communities

Resource team

15:00-15:30

Mapping of superstitions, psychological barrier with regard to water & sanitation practices and scientific arguments against these

Resource team

15:30-16:30

Dry run on ‘Total Sanitation Approach’ facilitation tools / techniques

Resource team

Day-2

9:30-10:30

Planning for field work-code of conduct , agenda, roles & responsibilities amongst the group members

Resource team

10:30-11:30

Groups to develop their strategies for the field study and present

Group exercise

11:30-12:30

Lunch

 

12:30-16:30

Field study :

Following tools may be carried out with flexibility, with the community in the given sequence :

a)      Walk of Shame

b)      Social/defecation mapping

c)      Calculation of Faeces

d)      Flow diagram-(How Faeces come back to us)

e)      Fecal-Oral route through live demonstration

f)        Cost of illness

g)      Water Quality Testing

h)      Post triggering activity(community Monitoring)

Group Activity

Day-3

9:30-11:30

Sharing of field experiences from day 2:learning, difficulties, observation and fine tuning of strategy (if required)

Presentation by each group

12:30-16:30

Repeat the same process in the second village with limited facilitation from the team leader/facilitator, each group has a de-briefing session with respective team leaders

Group Activity

Day – 4

9:00-10:00

Introduce framework for the action plan to natural leaders to share their experiences and plan for local action

Resource team

10:00-12:00

Preparation of action plan (for six month )

Group exercise

12:00-12:30

Presentation on action plan

Presentation by each group

12:30-13:00

Tips on training skills

Resource team

13:30-14:00

Participatory evaluation of the workshop

Resource team

14:00-14:15

Closing remarks

Resource team

 

Note: CAPART is implementing NGA programme in the 1st phase involving NGOs who had offered their willingness in response to the Expression of Interest advertised in the news papers by the Ministry of Rural Development. CAPART will notify for implementing NGA programme in the 2nd phase as soon as the projects in the 1st phase are completed

 

Target Areas in the First Phase

 

LIST OF DISTRICTS Where Performance of Individual Household Latrines is 0 %

Sr.

State

Sr.

District

Sanctioned Date

Sr.

Block

Is it Panchayat-Block

1

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

1

KURUNG KUMEY

23-11-2005

1

PALIN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

2

SANGRAM

Y

2

BIHAR

1

BUXAR

23-11-2005

3

CHAKKI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

4

CHAUGAIN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

5

CHAUSA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

6

ITARHI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

7

NAWANAGAR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

8

RAJPUR

Y

 

 

2

GOPALGANJ

20-02-2006

9

BHOREY

Y

 

 

 

 

 

10

HATHUA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

11

KUCHAIKOTE

Y

 

 

3

JEHANABAD

15-07-2005

12

GHOSHI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

13

KARPI

Y

 

 

4

KHAGARIA

20-02-2006

14

ALAULI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

15

CHAUTHAM

Y

 

 

 

 

 

16

PARBATTA

Y

 

 

5

LAKHISARAI

20-02-2006

17

HALSI

Y

 

 

6

MADHEPURA

20-02-2006

18

CHAUSA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

19

GWALPARA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

20

PURAINI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

21

SHANKARPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

22

SINGHESHWAR

Y

 

 

7

MUNGER

20-02-2006

23

ASARGANJ

Y

 

 

 

 

 

24

TARAPUR

Y

 

 

8

NAWADA

20-02-2006

25

MESKAUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

26

NARDIGANJ

Y

 

 

 

 

 

27

NARHAT

Y

 

 

 

 

 

28

ROH

Y

 

 

9

SASARAM(ROHTAS)

23-11-2005

29

CHENARI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

30

DAWATH

Y

 

 

 

 

 

31

DINARA

Y

Sr.

State

Sr.

District

Sanctioned Date

Sr.

Block

Is it Panchayat-Block

 

 

 

 

 

32

KARAKAT

Y

 

 

 

 

 

33

KARGAHAR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

34

KOCHAS

Y

 

 

 

 

 

35

NAUHATTA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

36

RAJPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

37

SANJHAULI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

38

SHEOSAGAR

Y

 

 

10

SAHARSA

20-02-2006

39

NAUHATTA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

40

SALKHUA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

41

SAUR BAZAR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

42

SONBARSA

Y

 

 

11

SHEOHAR

20-02-2006

43

TARIANI CHOWK

Y

 

 

12

SHEIKHPURA

20-02-2006

44

CHEWARA

Y

 

 

13

SIWAN

17-05-2005

45

ANDAR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

46

BARHARIA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

47

DARAULI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

48

GUTHANI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

49

NAUTAN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

50

PACHRUKHI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

51

ZIRADEI

Y

 

 

14

SUPAUL

20-02-2006

52

BASANTPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

53

KISHANPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

54

PIPRA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

55

RAGHOPUR

Y

3

HIMACHAL PRADESH

1

CHAMBA

17-05-2005

56

BHARMOUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

57

MEHLA

Y

 

 

2

KANGRA

12/3/2003

58

BAIJNATH

Y

 

 

 

 

 

59

BHAWARNA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

60

FATEHPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

61

INDORA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

62

LAMBAGAON

Y

 

 

 

 

 

63

NAGROTA SURIAN

Y

Sr.

State

Sr.

District

Sanctioned Date

Sr.

Block

Is it Panchayat-Block

 

 

 

 

 

64

PRAGPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

65

RAIT

Y

 

 

3

KINNAUR

20-02-2003

66

KALPA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

67

NICHAR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

68

POOH

Y

 

 

4

SHIMLA

17-05-2005

69

BASANTPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

70

MASHOBRA

Y

 

 

5

UNA

20-02-2003

71

AMB

Y

 

 

 

 

 

72

DHUNDLA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

73

GAGRET

Y

 

 

 

 

 

74

HAROLI

Y

4

MEGHALAYA

1

EAST KHASI HILLS

14-01-2004

75

MAWKYNREW

Y

 

 

 

 

 

76

MAWPHLANG

Y

 

 

 

 

 

77

MAWRYNGKNENG

Y

 

 

 

 

 

78

MYLLIEM

Y

 

 

 

 

 

79

PYNURSLA

Y

 

 

2

RI BHOI

23-11-2005

80

UMLING

Y

 

 

 

 

 

81

UMSNING

Y

5

NAGALAND

1

MON

20-02-2006

82

CHEN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

83

MON

Y

 

 

 

 

 

84

TIZIT

Y

 

 

 

 

 

85

TOBU

Y

 

 

2

ZUNHEBOTO

23-04-2002

86

TOKIYE

Y

6

PUNJAB

1

AMRITSAR

2/5/2003

87

AJNALA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

88

BHIKHIWIND

Y

 

 

 

 

 

89

CHOGAWAN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

90

CHOHLA SAHIB

Y

 

 

 

 

 

91

GANDIWIND

Y

 

 

 

 

 

92

KHADOOR SAHIB

Y

 

 

 

 

 

93

TARSIKKA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

94

VALTOHA

Y

 

 

2

GURDASPUR

2/5/2003

95

BAMIAL

Y

 

 

 

 

 

96

DHAR KALAN

Y

Sr.

State

Sr.

District

Sanctioned Date

Sr.

Block

Is it Panchayat-Block

 

 

 

 

 

97

KAHNUWAN

Y

 

 

3

JALANDHAR

2/5/2003

98

RURKA KALAN

Y

 

 

4

KAPURTHALA

2/5/2003

99

NADALA

Y

 

 

5

MANSA

15-07-2005

100

BHIKHI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

101

BUDHLADA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

102

JHUNIR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

103

SARDULGARH

Y

 

 

6

MOGA

18-09-2001

104

NIHAL SINGH WALA

Y

 

 

7

NAWANSHAHR

2/5/2003

105

AUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

106

SAROYA

Y

7

RAJASTHAN

1

BANSWARA

11/3/2005

107

GARHI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

108

GHATOL

Y

 

 

 

 

 

109

PEEPALKHOONT

Y

 

 

 

 

 

110

SAJJANGARH

Y

 

 

2

BARAN

15-07-2005

111

ATRU

Y

 

 

 

 

 

112

CHHIPABAROD

Y

 

 

 

 

 

113

KISHANGANJ

Y

 

 

 

 

 

114

SHAHBAD

Y

 

 

3

DHOLPUR

11/3/2005

115

BASERI

Y

 

 

4

DUNGARPUR

11/3/2005

116

ASPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

117

BICHHIWARA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

118

SIMALWARA

Y

 

 

5

JALOR

15-07-2005

119

AHORE

Y

 

 

 

 

 

120

JASWANTPURA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

121

SAYLA

Y

 

 

6

JODHPUR

11/3/2005

122

BAP

Y

 

 

 

 

 

123

BHOPALGARH

Y

 

 

 

 

 

124

BILARA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

125

LUNI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

126

OSIAN

Y

 

 

 

 

 

127

PHALODI

Y

 

 

 

 

 

128

SHERGARH

Y

 

 

7

PALI

17-05-2005

129

DESURI

Y

Sr.

State

Sr.

District

Sanctioned Date

Sr.

Block

Is it Panchayat-Block

 

 

 

 

 

130

RAIPUR

Y

 

 

 

 

 

131

ROHAT

Y

8

CHATTISGARH

1

RAIGARH

20-02-2006

132

LAILUNGA

Y

 

 

 

 

 

133

PUSSORE

Y

 

 

 

 

 

134

TAMNAR

Y

 



[1] Source: http://www.ddws.nic.in

2  Source: RGNDWM, GOI, 2002-03 and WSP-SA, India